The Art of Winning Blog

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Five Reasons Why I am Excited for the Stephen Hayes Seminar on Cause, Effect, and Emptiness:
By Emily Lopez

1. I will be training with my peers in an intimate, more intensive setting.
2. I am excited to cultivate and to expand my mind body as well as my physical body.
3. As I feel my level of vulnerability increase, I am experiencing a shift in my awareness. I am wanting to further build upon this shift in awareness.
4. The opportunity to experience Mr. Hayes and his teachings, and to learn more about To-Shin Do.
5. I am excited to explore what is possible.


Wednesday, August 6, 2014

The Dude Abides: Black belt essay: Bert Gehorsam

Bert Gehorsam – Black Belt Essay, June, 2014

 

“The Dude Abides”

 

Abide: transitive verb, Merriam-Webster

1:  to wait for :  await

2 a :  to endure without yielding :  withstand

  b :  to bear patiently :  tolerate 

 

 

I started my martial arts path when I was eighteen. Why? I wanted to be a badass. Up to that point I spent my life in inner city New York. I had seen violence and had been subjected to violence and as a result, I wanted no more of either and thought martial arts would help.. The problem was everyone else in my class wanted to be a badass too. And most of them were already waaaaay more badass than me - and willing to prove it. Not always a lot of fun, especially since like the Dude, played by Jeff Bridges in the 1998 film “The Big LebowskI, by nature I am a non-confrontational pacifist.

 

identify with much of the Dude’s outlook.  Known for the phrase “the Dude abides”  (also “…this aggression will not stand, man!.”), he is thoughtful and rarely reactive in a negative way, takes life as it comesand sees brightness in the future.

 

With that perspective in mind, I continued to experiment with a handful of martial arts styles over the years. Some were better than others, but none ever caught my full attention as a viable skill set with a good philosophy of application. Most dojos were just a place for tough guy contests –(although I have to admit that the windiness and spirit of aikido was a bright standout in the sea of bad martial arts offerings.)

 

Over the years, I began to understand that martial arts isn’t just learning a set of self defense techniquesbut also learning when and how to best use them andperhaps most importantly, learning how to potentially never use them. Thisperspective feels much more important than having a “let’s see who’s tougher competition that seems core to so many dojos. To me, the true essence of being a warrior is knowing when and how to use your power. Its being the one who can learn to live confidently with courage and compassion. In short, being a warrior is much more complex than being a tough guy.

 

Happily, a few years ago I found To Shin Do.  Having embraced this path I not only learned self defense techniques, I also learned the importance of the history, the real world techniques, mystic teachings and exercises that now  have become a deep passion for meA part of me. This path has led to the creation of a community offocused and aware people; peaceful warriors.

 

What I have gained by training in To Shin Do…is a basket full. Along with practical self-defense skills, body awareness, increased conditioning and agility, I have alsobecome Reiki 2 certified, developed a regular meditation practice, and heightened awareness and presence in the world. Time has slowed. I am able to process my surroundings and situations with more clarity and speed and respond in ways I feelare appropriate and lead to the right action.

 

Our dojo is not a place where we compete to see who is the biggest badass. It is ahome for our community to gather, to train, to share technique and to connect with like-minded people.  We help each other grow as martial artists and as members of the community at large. I have faced some trying personal experiences while a member of the Boulder Quest Center, and have always received support and compassion from our members. I have never felt judged. The dojo is truly one of my happy places.

 

So now my path has taken me to my Shodan test. Is it a milestone? Yes, but I have realized that like receiving my white belt, it is another step on my path. I am grateful and proud I took the first step, I am grateful and proud to have reached this level. Earning a black belt is on my bucket list but will soon be replaced with earning a second-degree black belt.

 

Somewhere along the path, being ninja has changed from something I study to something I am. One day being ninja walked out of the front door of the dojo with me and colored every part of my world. For this I am most grateful.

 

I want to thank my family, all my teachers, training partners and fellow students for their enthusiastic sharing of technique, knowledge, support and friendship on this journey. There are no bad days when training. Every kata and ukeme is a step on the path. Every step on the path brings me closer to my goals.

 

The Hagakure speaks of samurai always being prepared for their own death. My understanding of this requires one to be present enough to live every moment.Whenever this comes to mind, I cannot help but think of our friend Bradley. He lived every moment. And until that moment is my moment, I, like the Dude, will abide.


Saturday, June 14, 2014

Now hiring: Office Ninja

Position Summary:
The Office Ninja is a demanding position that requires your best, not just in your job, but also in your life. The successful Office Ninja leads volunteers and staff with confidence, enthusiasm, and grace. The Office Ninja drives organization and looks for ways to improve processes and procedures. The Office Ninja leads a person from Prospect through to Student and shares Student responsibilities with the Head Instructor.

An Office Ninja:
   * Tunes the administrative engine so everything runs smoothly
   * Engages people in the art
   * Makes people feel welcome
   * Helps people commit to the path
   * Loves organizing
   * Believes in To-Shin Do, Stephen K. Hayes, and themselves
   * Wants to make a difference

Key Measures For Success:
   * 24-hour turnaround on Prospect processes, including follow-up calls and data entry
   * 24-hour turnaround on Student processes, including follow-up calls, initial paperwork, and billing.
   * Net gains in student counts monthly
   * 80% conversion from Prospect to Student
   * 100% calendar accuracy
   * All monthly events are on the website at least 1 week before they occur

Duties/Responsibilities:
   * Development and Execution of Prospect Processes
          Enrolls new students
          Follow-Up calls and emails
          Appointment scheduling
   * Database management
   * Development and Execution of Enrollment Process
   * Including cancellations and holds
   * Managing Monthly Tuition Billing
   * Marketing for Events
           Internal flyers
           Website
   * Event registrations
   * Scheduling
            Maintains paper and online calendar
            Liaison with students and staff for private lesson and special event scheduling
   * Retail
           Manages retail display 
           Suggests new items for ordering
   * Purchasing
           Budgets and buys office supplies
           Budgets and buys janitorial supplies
           Budgets and buys gi as needed

Required Knowledge/Skills/Abilities:
Business writing and etiquette
MS Word
MS Excel
MS Publisher
Database management
Customer Services skills
Excellent phone skills and manners

Required Education/Experience:
Some college preferred

Expected Hours:
30-40 hours per week
*Could have some of these hours as an Instructor for the right candidate*

Compensation:
Starts at $8-$10/hour plus bonuses (generally becomes $11-$14/hour)
 
 

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Meditation and Healing

I was thinking today about my first experience of meditation and I can't remember if I've ever blogged about it. A quick version of the story is that I was 19 years old and had an anaphylactic reaction to an antibiotic. In the hospital, I kept hyperventilating so they wanted me to breathe into a paper bag. The problem was that I couldn't feel my face to know if I had a good seal so I'd slip and be hyperventilating and not know it. At some point, I realized I could hear the heart rate monitor and I realized that as long as it was beeping, then I was alive. Furthermore, if it was beeping steadily, then I wasn't hyperventilating. I used the rhythm of the beeping to know if I needed to adjust the bag. 

The obvious (omote) lesson here is that you can consciously control your breathing. A little more subtle lesson is that you can effect your entire body, including your mind, with your breathing. But I think the hidden (ura) lesson is the healing symbiosis of mind and breath. You can use your breath to feed your healing. It's obvious when we think about how our autonomic breathing is effected when we are injured but it's so instinctual that we take it for granted. Consider the possibility that the breathing is a healing response. What then does that mean for emotional healing? We have different breathing patterns as part of the elemental teachings. What if we thought of these as different healing methods. What would it possible for us to unlock?

Monday, May 26, 2014

Doing the Bolder Boulder Wrong (and Right)

I did a lot of things wrong at the Bolder Boulder. I didn't train. I wore brand new sneakers. I drank wine the night before. I missed early registration. 

I did a lot of things right too. I went with friends. I had a really fun time. I was blindfolded (yes, in my book that's right). I danced and high fived my way to the finish line. 

I could've let all my 'wrongs' stop me. I could've decided that I needed to be faster, stronger, thinner, more trained, or let any excuse stand in my way. But letting fear and smallness stand in my way isn't the ninja way. Our motto is Unleash Your Potential and that's just how I feel today. 

Thursday, May 15, 2014

A Great Loss

The dojo has lost one of its own as Bradley Holcmb passed away last night. A dedicated student of the art and of life, Brad had one of my favorite smiles. He brought with him a joy and thoughtfulness to the mystery that is life. Over the coming days, we'll have more information about how to support Lucretia, John, and Lena as they adjust. For now, please keep the family in your prayers in whatever way feels good for you to do so. Take a moment today to be grateful for all the joy and beauty in your life. Be present with your grief and your memories of Brad. 

To- Shin!
Mary Aitoshi

For meal support: http://www.mealtrain.com/?id=mrer8l7t57ft
For donations: https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/9vn4/coworker-tribute-to-brad-holcomb/updates/74595


Sunday, May 11, 2014

My Momma Taught Me

I called my momma first thing this morning. Then I put on my fancy feather earrings and drove through the snow to dance class. It was a special Yin inspired class to honor our mothers and all the people and things we are mothering in our lives. As I reflect on my mom and mothering, I wanted to share the most important thing my momma taught me: be happy. 

My mom hasn't had it easy. Born in 1932, widowed in the early 50s, divorced in the 70s, and again in the 80s, and widowed again a couple years ago. She's got 4 children and she's lost just as many. Her 7 year old son died on the same day as her father, in unrelated incidents. Some days she struggles; some days she's annoyed that she's had to be so strong, endured so much. But even in those times, her spirit strives for happiness. 

Talking today, she reminded me: "You can't pick what happens to you. The circumstances of life happen. But you get to choose how you'll be in it. You can be happy or you can bring everyone down with you. Bring people into your life who support your happy." 

So today, whatever you are doing, do it in a way that supports your happy. You're worth it. We all are. 


Stephen K. Hayes Pro Shop



1501 Lee Hill Road #18|Boulder, Colorado 80304|Phone: 303.440.3647|Email: ninja@boulderquest.com